COMPLETE TRANSCRIPT

Welcome to ESLPod.com's “Day in the Life of Jeff.” I'm your host, Dr. Jeff McQuillan, from the Center for Educational Development.

In the first episode of “A Day in the Life of Jeff,” I talked about how I get up every morning. In part two, we're going to talk about “Cleaning Up,” what you do in the morning to get ready to eat and go to work. Let's get started.

[Start of story]

I go into my bathroom sometime around 6:45 a.m. My sink and medicine cabinet are on the left when you enter my bathroom. The toilet is next to that, with the tub in front. Anyway, I turn on the lights, and try to find the mouthwash in the medicine cabinet. I pour a small amount into a cup, swish it around for 30 seconds, gargle, and spit. Not pleasant, but necessary. Then I get out the floss. When I’m done flossing, I pull out the toothbrush and the toothpaste. I brush and then it’s off to the shower.

I pull the shower curtain aside, step into the tub, and pull the curtain back. I turn on both the hot and the cold water, looking for the perfect temperature. I lather up with soap, put some shampoo in my hair, then rinse and dry off. Now it’s shaving time. I used to own an electric razor, but I found it didn’t shave close enough. So now I’m back to the old hand razor. I lather up with shaving cream, and I start to shave. I rinse the razor and throw the disposable blades in the trash. It’s about 7:00 AM, and I’m on to breakfast.

[End of story]

In this episode, we are “Cleaning Up,” or making ourselves clean.

“I go into my bathroom,” I begin the story, “sometime around 6:45 a.m.” Notice that we say a.m., but you could also say, “in the morning.” 6:45 is also the same as quarter to seven. “My sink and medicine cabinet are on the left when you enter my bathroom.” In your bathroom and in your kitchen there is usually a sink and a faucet. The faucet, “faucet,” is where the water comes out, and normally you have hot water and cold water. The sink is where the water goes into. Usually, it is a round or a square white bowl, really, that has a hole at the bottom and we call that hole the drain, “drain.” That's where the water goes down into the pipe—it's where the water goes out of the sink. If you want to fill your sink with water, you usually have to stop the drain. To stop a drain means to put something over it so that the water doesn't go down.

So, we have a faucet and we have a sink, and in your bathroom, you often have a small box, sometimes with a mirror on it so you can see yourself, that we call the medicine cabinet. A cabinet, “cabinet,” is like a small box where you put things, but it's a box that hangs on the wall—it is attached to the wall. You can have cabinets in your kitchen, where you put your dishes. So, they're containers—they're things that you used to put and store or keep things.

A medicine cabinet is a place where you have medicine, but also, it's a place where you put your other things that you use in the bathroom; things like mouthwash, shaving cream, razors and so forth. We'll talk about those in a second. So, that's your medicine cabinet.

In my bathroom, the “sink and the medicine cabinet are on the left” side when you walk into the bathroom, “the toilet is next to that to.” The toilet, “toilet,” is what you use to go to the bathroom—what you use to get rid of things from your body, we might say. When you are done using the toilet, you then flush the toilet. The verb, to flush, “flush,” is when you get rid of what's inside the toilet after you're done using it, usually with water.

There is a tub in my bathroom. A tub, “tub,” sometimes called a bathtub, is where you can take a bath. You can fill the tub up with water and you can get into the water.

“Anyway,” I say in the story, “I turn on the lights.” Notice the use of the word “anyway.” It's common in English to use that word when you want to get back to something you were talking about before. We can also say, “as I was saying,” it means something similar here.

“Anyway, I turn on the lights, and try to find the mouthwash in the medicine cabinet.” The mouthwash, “mouthwash,” (all one word) is a liquid like water, but it has something in it that helps clean your teeth—clean the inside of your mouth; that is mouthwash. So, you take the mouthwash and you “pour a small amount into a cup.” The mouthwash usually comes in, or is in, a bottle. This bottle, you take and you pour some mouthwash into a cup. To pour means to take something that is liquid, like water or mouthwash, and put it somewhere else. In this case, it's into a small cup.

After it put it into the cup, I “swish it around for 30 seconds.” To swish, “swish,” something around means to move it around, and we use that verb usually when talking about something that is liquid like water or mouthwash that you move back and forth very quickly. So, when you put the mouthwash in your mouth, usually you take your sides of your mouth, what we would call your cheeks, “cheeks,” your cheeks and you move them back and forth, so that the mouthwash covers and cleans all of your teeth.

After “I swish it around,” I “gargle.” The verb to gargle, “gargle,” means to take water and to put it into your back of your mouth. I will have to demonstrate this; it's easier to understand if you can hear it. [Gargling sound] That's to gargle. That's just an extra little bonus for listening to this episode; you get to hear me gargle!

Well, after I gargle, I have to get rid of or remove the water from my mouth, and I do that by spitting. To spit, “spit,” means to take something that's liquid, like water, and to remove it from your mouth. Usually, you make a certain sound like [spitting sound]; something like that.

Well, now we've gargled and spit. I say these are “Not pleasant, but necessary.” Not necessarily something nice but something I have to do. After I use the mouthwash, “Then I get out,” or take out, “the floss.” Floss, “floss,” is a piece of string that you put in between your teeth to clean; we call that floss. And, there's a verb, to floss, which means to use that little piece of string.

“When I’m done flossing,” when I'm finished flossing, “I pull out,” or take out, “the toothbrush and the toothpaste.” The toothbrush is what you use to clean your teeth; the toothpaste is like the soap that you use to clean your teeth. But, we do not call it tooth soap; we call it toothpaste. It comes in a container that we call a tube, and the tube, “tube,” is where the toothpaste is, and you usually squeeze the tube, “squeeze,” to get the toothpaste out of the tube.

So, I put some toothpaste on my toothbrush and then I brush. We use that verb, to brush, to mean to clean my teeth. But, we don't say, “I'm going to clean my teeth,” usually, we say, “I'm going to brush my teeth.” That same verb, to brush, can also be used with your hair, when you are trying to put your hair in a certain place—a certain position. I don't brush my hair, of course, because I don't have any hair, but I used to, when I was younger, brush my hair.

I finished brushing my teeth, so now I'm going to take a shower. There's a difference between taking a shower, where the water comes from the top of the wall and goes over you, and a bath, which means to fill your bathtub with water and get in. Most American homes have the tub and the shower in one place. Some homes have a separate shower and a separate tub.

In the story, I say that “I pull the shower curtain aside.” The curtain, “curtain,” is what you use to keep the water in the shower from going onto the floor. It prevents the water from leaving the shower area. We use that word, curtain, also for the things that you can put over your window in your house or apartment, so nobody can see inside; that's also called a curtain.

Well, “I pull the shower curtain aside,” meaning I put it to one side—the left side or the right side. I “step into the tub, and I pull the curtain back,” I put it back in its original position. “I turn on both the hot and the cold water.” To turn on means that I turn the faucet on so that the water comes out. Remember, the faucet is where water comes out for a sink; it's also where the water comes out for a tub or a shower. Actually, for the shower—the top of the shower, we don't normally call that a faucet, we call that a showerhead, “head.” So, the showerhead is where the water comes out when you're taking a shower. And, if you are drawing a bath, meaning if you are putting water into your tub to take a bath—to draw a bath—then you use the faucet. The water comes out of the faucet spout, “spout,” that's the part of the faucet where the water actually comes out of.

I step into the shower, I turn on “the hot and cold water, looking for the perfect temperature,” not too hot, not too cold. “I lather up with soap.” To lather, “lather,” or to lather up, means to take soap and put it on your skin and then put water on it, and you rub the soap and the water together until you make little bubbles— until the soap and water covers your skin. That is to lather or to lather up.

Well, “I lather up with” some “soap,” and then I “put some shampoo in my hair.” Shampoo, “shampoo,” is the soap for your head—for your hair, if you have hair. So, you take this special soap, usually it is a liquid soap, and you put it on your hair and that is called shampoo. You can also lather up your shampoo. You take your hands and you move them back and forth quickly, and that would lather up your shampoo.

Well, after you do that, then you have to get rid of the soap and the shampoo, and you do that by rinsing. To rinse, “rinse,” means to take water and get rid of the soap and the shampoo that are on your body. After you do that, then you have to dry your body off. To dry off means the same as to dry, but we use that expression, to dry off, to mean to dry, in this case, your body with a towel.

Now, it is time for me to shave. To shave, “shave,” means to remove hair, usually from your face. If you are a man and you don't shave, you will grow a beard and a mustache; you will have hair on your face. Well, I don't like beards and mustaches, so I shave—I use something to get rid of the hair.

The thing I use to get rid of the hair is the razor, “razor.” A razor is like a knife, it has a blade, “blade,” and the blade is the thing that actually cuts the hair—that removes the hair. So, you have a razor that you use to shave the whiskers from your face. A whisker, “whisker,” is the name we give the hair on your face, at least for a man, we call those whiskers. So, you can have an electric razor, like I used to have, or you can have a hand razor. A hand razor is one that is not electric that you just take and you shave by moving the razor back and forth on your face.

Before I shave, I have to “lather up with shaving cream.” We already know that word, lather up, it means to mix the soap with water and make bubbles so that it spreads across your skin. Shaving cream, “cream,” is the special kind of soap or special kind of liquid material that you put on your face to make it easier for you to shave, so you don't cut yourself or hurt yourself when you are shaving.

“I rinse the razor” after I am done shaving, and I “throw the disposable blades in the trash.” The blades are the things that go on top of the razor that cut the whiskers, or remove the whiskers. Disposable, “disposable,” comes from the verb to dispose, “dispose,” which means to throw away—to put in the trash—to put in the garbage. That is disposable. If something is disposable, you use it once or twice and then you it throw away. Well, these are disposable blades.

Now it's seven o'clock, when I finish showering and shaving, and I am “on to breakfast,” meaning now I am going to have my breakfast.

Let's listen to the story again, this time at a native rate of speech.

[Start of story]

I go into my bathroom sometime around 6:45 a.m. My sink and medicine cabinet are on the left when you enter my bathroom. The toilet is next to that, with the tub in front. Anyway, I turn on the lights, and try to find the mouthwash in the medicine cabinet. I pour a small amount into a cup, swish it around for 30 seconds, gargle, and spit. Not pleasant, but necessary. Then I get out the floss. When I’m done flossing, I pull out the toothbrush and the toothpaste. I brush and then it’s off to the shower.

I pull the shower curtain aside, step into the tub, and pull the curtain back. I turn on both the hot and the cold water, looking for the perfect temperature. I lather up with soap, put some shampoo in my hair, then rinse and dry off. Now it’s shaving time. I used to own an electric razor, but I found it didn’t shave close enough. So now I’m back to the old hand razor. I lather up with shaving cream, and I start to shave. I rinse the razor and throw the disposable blades in the trash. It’s about 7:00 AM, and I’m on to breakfast.

[End of story]

That concludes part two of “A Day in the Life of Jeff.” In part three, we'll “Eat Our Breakfast.”

This course has been a production of the Center for Educational Development, in beautiful Los Angeles, California. Visit our web site at eslpod.com.

This course was produced by Dr. Jeff McQuillan and Dr. Lucy Tse. Copyright 2006.

results matching ""

    No results matching ""